Alec Nevala-Lee

Thoughts on art, creativity, and the writing life.

How is a poem like a machine?

with 2 comments

William Carlos Williams

To make two bald statements: There’s nothing sentimental about a machine, and: A poem is a small (or large) machine made out of words. When I say there’s nothing sentimental about a poem, I mean that there can be no part that is redundant.

Prose may carry a load of ill-defined matter like a ship. But poetry is a machine which drives it, pruned to a perfect economy. As in all machines, its movement is intrinsic, undulant, a physical more than a literary character…

When a man makes a poem, makes it, mind you, he takes words as he finds them interrelated about him and composes them—without distortion which would mar their exact significances—into an intense expression of his perceptions and ardors that they may constitute a revelation in the speech that he uses. It isn’t what he says that counts as a work of art, it’s what he makes, with such intensity of perception that it lives with an intrinsic movement of its own to verify its authenticity. Your attention is called now and then to some beautiful line or sonnet-sequence because of what is said there. So be it. To me all sonnets say the same thing of no importance. What does it matter what the line “says?”

There is no poetry of distinction without formal invention, for it is in the intimate form that works of art achieve their exact meaning, in which they most resemble the machine, to give language its highest dignity, its illumination in the environment to which it is native. Such war, as the arts live and breathe by, is continuous.

William Carlos Williams, “Introduction to The Wedge”

Written by nevalalee

July 3, 2016 at 7:30 am

2 Responses

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  1. redundancy now becomes a necessity of all machines and all literature.

    fastcoolsites

    July 3, 2016 at 10:36 am

  2. @fastcoolsites: A little redundancy in fiction can be a good thing!

    nevalalee

    July 16, 2016 at 6:44 am


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