Alec Nevala-Lee

Thoughts on art, creativity, and the writing life.

The cellist and the rock

with 2 comments

Pablo Casals

When the cellist [Pablo Casals] visited San Francisco in 1901, he suffered a serious injury to his bowing hand during a hike up Mount Tamalpais, the highest point in Marin County, just across the Golden Gate Bridge. A large rock had fallen on his hand, crushing several fingers. The first thought that came to his mind, Casals later said, was, “Thank God, I’ll never have to play the cello again!”

Sara Solovitch, Playing Scared

Written by nevalalee

August 9, 2015 at 7:30 am

2 Responses

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  1. It’s amazing that sometimes we can be great at doing something we truly despise. I used to be a cheerleader. I’m not really the bubbly, outgoing type. It was tough most days being someone I wasn’t, but I was good at it, not the best, but I made the varsity teams and what not and people could depend on me to not mess up the big stunts. When I got injured and was told I could either quit or get a hip replacement, I quit in a heart beat. I started playing golf. I loved it. I didn’t have to talk to anyone if I didn’t want to. I could hit balls on the range in my own thoughts all day or go out for nine holes after school and just be in nature. I’m gonna look up Pablo Casals now. Thanks for sharing this quote! It got me thinking!

    originaltitle

    August 10, 2015 at 7:31 am

  2. @originaltitle: I suspect that many novelists secretly look forward to the day they can give up writing forever, and just coast on what they’ve already done. Of course, that’s just a delusion in itself—but it’s a delusion that keeps a lot of us going.

    nevalalee

    September 6, 2015 at 2:15 pm


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