Alec Nevala-Lee

Thoughts on art, creativity, and the writing life.

My ten great movies #1: The Red Shoes

with 3 comments

Like all great films, but much more so, The Red Shoes—which I think is the greatest movie ever made—works on two levels, as both a story of life and a story of film. As the latter, it’s simply the most inventive movie ever made in Technicolor, second only to Citizen Kane in its abundance of tricks and flourishes. These range from small cinematic jokes (like its use of the scrolling title Forty-five minutes later, subsequently borrowed by Scorsese in The Aviator, to indicate the passage of time within a single shot) to effects of unforgettable emotional power (like the empty spotlight on the stage in the final scene). It’s the definitive work by a pair of filmmakers who had spent the previous decade on an unparalleled streak, making more great films in ten years than five ordinary directors could produce in an entire career. And The Red Shoes was the movie they had been building toward all along, because along with everything else, it’s the best film we have about the artistic process itself.

And even here, it works on multiple levels. As a depiction of life at a ballet company, it may not be as realistic as it seems—Moira Shearer, among others, has dismissed it as pure fantasy—but it feels real, and it remains the most romantic depiction of creative collaboration yet captured on film. (It inspired countless careers in dance, and certainly inspired me to care deeply about ballet, an art form toward which I’d been completely indifferent before seeing this movie.) And as an allegory, it’s unsurpassed: Lermontov’s cruelty toward Vicky is really a dramatization of the dialogue between art and practicality that takes place inside every artist’s head. This may be why The Red Shoes is so important to me now: from the moment I first saw it, it’s been one of my ten favorite films, but over the years, and especially after I decided to become a writer, my love for it has increased beyond what I feel toward almost any other work of art. Yet Vicky’s final words still haunt me, as does Lermontov’s offhand remark, which stands as a permanent warning, and enticement, to artists of all kinds: “The red shoes are never tired.”

Written by nevalalee

May 22, 2015 at 9:00 am

3 Responses

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  1. I gotta watch this movie then.
    Anyways, have you seen Eternal Sunshine of Spotless Mind? I’m sure you must have…is it on the list?

    https://motionpictureaficionado.wordpress.com/2015/05/01/eternal-sunshine-of-the-spotless-mind-2004-the-world-forgetting-by-the-world-forgot/

    mediocrenick

    May 22, 2015 at 9:04 am

  2. yes

    mumbleee

    May 22, 2015 at 9:27 am

  3. It’s definitely a movie I admire immensely, although if I had to pick one Charlie Kaufman film these days, it’d be Synecdoche, New York.

    nevalalee

    June 1, 2015 at 9:04 pm


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