Alec Nevala-Lee

Thoughts on art, creativity, and the writing life.

“She was quite happy to get a chair, or even a toy…”

with 2 comments

Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes

To my knowledge, [Plath] never scrapped any of her poetic efforts. With one or two exceptions, she brought every piece she worked on to some final form acceptable to her, rejecting at most the odd verse, or a false head or a false tail. Her attitude to her verse was artisan-like: if she couldn’t get a table out of the material, she was quite happy to get a chair, or even a toy. The end product for her was not so much a successful poem, as something that had temporarily exhausted her ingenuity.

Ted Hughes, in The Collected Poems of Sylvia Plath

Written by nevalalee

November 2, 2013 at 9:00 am

2 Responses

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  1. Her attitude to her verse was artisan-like
    – a wonderful way to approach any writing, whether verse or prose.

    vicbriggs

    November 2, 2013 at 10:14 am

  2. Absolutely. If we can’t be artists every day, we can at least be artisans.

    nevalalee

    November 3, 2013 at 9:56 am


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